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, the house pass a budget, senate pass a budget, as required by law and on time. so as i've talked to them, i feel pretty good about the constitutionality of the 27th amendment and how it applies to this. i would, if i could, make a couple other comments. i do think it's interesting in the spirit of bipartisanship, as you've pointed out, this was a piece of legislation for the most part pretty much mirrors what was introduced in the 112th with -- by a democrat with several other democratic co-sponsors as well as republicans here. i sort of feel like this is an effort at a bipartisan -- bipartisanship. i know sandy had to leave. we were talking about the ratings agencies and what debate. reading the executive management report from the ratings agency that also pointed to the congress that one of the reasons -- huge reason for the downgrade, they didn't feel that the congress had the political will to address the spending crisis that we are in either. so that was also a big part of the downgrade of our credit rating. now i think, you know, we are trying to exercise the political will to address
for this short-term extension is to just get congress to actually follow the law that congress wrote in 1974 which is to pass a budget by april 15. we're not saying what kind of budget they have to pass. just pass a budget. reason is the senate is going on four years now for not having passed a budget. we think this gives us the time we need in this nation to have a good thorough, vigorous and honest debate of what it takes to get our fiscal house in order and about how to budget. families budget. businesses budget. our federal government should budget. we actually have a law that says we should budget. all we're saying is follow that law and that's why the short- term extension before you today. i'll let the rest of it speak for itself. >> thank you very much. mr. levin. >> first, welcome, mr. chairman. >> thank you. i think this is the first -- >> i think this is the first time i have been before you. the first time any of us has been in the chair. >> thank you. i hope i'll do good enough and make you want to come back. >> i'll come back whether i want to or not. \[laughter] >> we still we
. >> -- to be his father and her father-in-law. i guess that's not happening now. help us out here. >> first things first, who is manti te'o, all-american linebacker for notre dame, the most tradition-rich football program in all the country. the yankees, the cowboys of college football. he was the star. >> this guy was going to win the heisman, man. >> he won every defensive award, best player on defense, second in the heisman, unheard of for a defensive player. and part of his story throughout the season was that in september of last year at the beginning of the season, his grandmother died, and then his girlfriend died within hours of each other. >> heartbreaking story. >> the reports range from an hour to a couple of days. >> you were watching and you cried. >> can i just say, my son, joey, said there's something wrong with this guy. he told me this months ago. >> joey is kind of wise. >> i was watching espn over the holidays. because alabama was on, the story. and they tell this story. and then i got a call the next morning. and it was like no, no, no! and i started tearing up. and i was like
or not these types of droughts and events have occurred in the past, they have. and as a result, the laws of chance simply tell us that they will happen again spent before we get to the policy question, this kind of goes with what we just addressed here, and margaret, you're a case study, and this is a question from alan. is question is, are you aware of any case studies where particular communities actually did take a proactive approach for drought management, and where it worked and where we could take a case -- take a look at the case study and applied elsewhere? >> well, i guess i would have to go back to historic times, because as i mentioned before i worked with navajo communities and so i know a lot about the way people coped with drought before reservation lands were established. and one of the things that people did was they were more aware of how the ecosystem operated, and would move according to what the current conditions work. they would move their livestock so they were more flexible, and the permitting systems and the types of things we have in place now as far as land tenure and wh
has failed to respond to a terrorist attack appropriately, treated as a law enforcement and diplomatic issue rather than it is the security issue that it is. at its core, this is yet another reflection of president obama's schizophrenic counterterrorism policy. the same administration that unapologetically reins down drone attacks on al qaeda affiliates in pakistan, yemen, will not use other counterterrorism resources to identify, locate and detain the terrorists involved in the death of our ambassador and others in libya. this inconsistent policy may stem from the president's hasty campaign promise to shut down guantanamo bay, gitmo, prematurely transfer detention facilities in iraq and afghanistan. in doing so the president effectively ended america's ability to detain and interrogate terrorists, depriving the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and other agencies of critical opportunities to obtain information on al qaeda networks. today, as the case of benghazi suspect harzi, has demonstrated, the united states is completely reliant on the cooperation of host countries to detain on our behalf and s
requirements. for example, to become a law, a bill must pass both houses of congress identical, then it's subject to the president's veto power, and then, of course, there's always the courts and the supreme court to rule on the constitutionality of legislation. the senate itself is a check on pure majority rule. as james madison said again, the use -- and this is to quote madison -- "the use of the senate is to consist in its proceeding with more coolness, with more system, with more wisdom than the popular branch," meaning the house of representatives. to achieve this person, sphrins the smallest states -- from the smallest states which the same number of representatives from the largest states, which i dmentd on earlier. further, senators are elected every six years, not every two years. these are ample to protect minority rights and to restrain pure majority rule. what is not necessary, what was never intended is an extra constitutional empowerment of the minority through a de facto requirement that a supermajority of senators be needed to even consider a bill or nominee, let alone
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6